Real Life Examples of Expository Writing

examples of expository writingThere are many styles of writing that are used for a wide variety of purposes. Expository writing is used to explain something to the reader. In exposition, the writer must use formal language, consistent formatting and fact based content. Different levels of education are a strong determining factor in the success of writing expository content.

A unique style takes time and a consistent effort to develop. Writing an essay others actually want to read, but still teaches the reader about a certain topic is done by writers who are determined, educated and dedicated to excellence. Taking a writing class like this one through Udemy is a wonderful way to begin educating yourself in expository writing. With practice and time, you can write like a professional.

What Are the Types of Exposition and What Are They Used For?

Exposition is used to inform, explain, describe or define subject matter. Expository writing can be found in educational publications, atlases and guides, biographical novels, newspapers and more. Certain types of expository texts are more appropriate for publication in scientific journals and textbooks than newspapers and magazines. Take an expository writing class like this one through Udemy to learn more about formatting expository texts to tailor specific publications.

Expository texts may be categorized by one or more of the following types:

  • Sequential Order
  • List
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Problem and Solution
  • Cause and Effect.

Sequential Ordering is often used in textbooks to explain major events in time. Lists are used to highlight certain aspects of an event or features of an object. For example, a biology or life sciences book will list all of the features of a basil plant and will explain its lifecycle, anatomy, uses, etc.

Listing is a way of explaining a number of different objects or events. Lists are usually published in textbooks or instruction manuals as a way to quickly and succinctly get as much information to the reader as possible.

Compare and Contrast exposition highlights the differences and similarities between people, places or things. Car magazines use compare and contrast exposition to debate the differences and similarities between a Chevy and Ford vehicle.

Cause and Effect patterns are used to explain events. After the 9/11 terrorist attacks, investigative journalists used cause and effect patterns to describe how a lack of education and socialization can lead to acts of terrorism.

Problem and Solution patterns are used to pitch ideas that solve major problems. Malala Yousafzai uses problem and solution patterns in her speeches to explain why educating children, especially girls, is so vitally important to improving our planet.

How to Format an Expository Essay

High School Level Expository Writing Samples: 

Paragraph 1: The Introduction
Topic Sentence (Thesis Statement)
Supporting Sentence #1 (Subtopic)
Supporting Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Supporting Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Conclusion (Reiterates the thesis statement)

Paragraph 2: Example #1
Topic Sentence Example #1 (re-worded from Paragraph #1, supporting sentence #1)
Supporting Sentence #1 (Subtopic)
Supporting Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Supporting Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Conclusion (Reiterates Example #1)

Paragraph 3: Example Paragraph #2
Topic Sentence Example #1 (re-worded from Paragraph #1, supporting sentence #2)
Supporting Sentence #1 (Subtopic)
Supporting Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Supporting Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Conclusion (Reiterates Paragraph #1, supporting sentence #2)

Paragraph 4: Example Paragraph #3
Topic Sentence Example #1 (re-worded from Paragraph #1, supporting sentence #3)
Supporting Sentence #1 (Subtopic)
Supporting Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Supporting Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Conclusion (Reiterates Paragraph #1, supporting sentence #3)

Paragraph 5: Conclusion
Topic Sentence (Restates the thesis statement in Paragraph #1)
Example Sentence #1 (Subtopic)
Example Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Example Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Concluding Sentence (Reiterates that the point is proven and optionally calls the reader to action)

High school expos formatting is very basic and allows for artistic expression within the text. Learn more about creative writing with a Udemy course.

College level expository writing is more disciplined and challenges writers to be more focused, factual and organized. Learn more about upper levels of writing with a college writing course like this one through Udemy.

College Expository Writing Samples:

Paragraph 1: The Introduction
Lead-In (Optional. Introduces the topic)
Thesis Statement (The point of your paper. The rest of your paper proves your point.)
Example Sentence #1 (Supporting the thesis)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Conclusion (Reiterates the thesis statement and supporting sentences)
Transitional Statement (Leads from the conclusion to the next paragraph’s topic)

Paragraph 2:
Topic Sentence
Example Sentence #1 (Supporting the thesis in Paragraph #1 and Paragraph #2 topic sentence)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Conclusion and/or Transitional Statement (Leads from the conclusion to the next paragraph’s topic)

Paragraph 3:
Topic Sentence
Example Sentence #1 (Supporting the thesis in Paragraph #1 and Paragraph #3 topic sentence)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Conclusion and/or Transitional Statement (Leads from the conclusion to the next paragraph’s topic)

Paragraph 4:
Topic Sentence
Example Sentence #1 (Supporting the thesis in Paragraph #1 and Paragraph #4 topic sentence)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #2 (Subtopic)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #3 (Subtopic)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Conclusion and/or Transitional Statement (Leads from the conclusion to the next paragraph’s topic)

Paragraph 5:
Thesis Statement (Reiterate the thesis of the paper.)
Example Sentence #1 (Restate strongest points from Paragraph #1)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #2 (Restate strongest points from Paragraph #2)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #3 (Restate strongest points from Paragraph #3)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Example Sentence #3 (Restate strongest points from Paragraph #4)
Qualifier #1 (Supporting the example sentence)
Qualifier #2 (Supporting qualifier #1 and the supporting example sentence)
Conclusion

College professors want to see consistency. Shifts in person and variations in sentence structure are counted as incorrect formatting. Properly formatted exposition can be incredibly powerful. The strict requirements of proper formatting disallow weaknesses in factual data and filler text. True expository writing backs up each main point with six supporting sentences. Supporting sentences and their qualifiers should all make a unique statement that backs up the thesis statement. That’s a lot of information!

In college level writing classes you will learn to format expository essays a little differently than in high school. You will develop skills necessary to navigate the business world successfully. If you are a beginning writer and need to establish professional skills to help you in your career, a technical writing class like this one through Udemy is a great place to start.