For this month’s L&D roundup, I’ve picked some interesting reads that stood out—the latest data trends on Millennials and engagement, as well as new ways to think about bias as it relates to hiring and women in leadership positions.

 

1. Millennials Don’t Want to Jump Ship Anymore

 

The Deloitte Millennial Survey 2017

Why we picked this for you:

Former job-hopping Millennials are growing up and are now less prone to jump ship. According to the latest 2017 Deloitte Millennial Survey, Millennials “planning to leave their company soon” dropped from 17% in 2016 to just 7% in 2017. The report shows that Millennials are now more likely to stay beyond 5 years than leave within 2 years. The 2016 election, heightened terrorism and, uncertainty in the world are some of the reasons why Millennials crave more stability.

Key takeaways:

 

2. Not All Bias is Bad Bias

 

Frank Kalman, Managing Editor at Talent Economy

Why we picked this for you:

As organizations shift to rely more heavily on technology to correct unconscious bias in evaluating and hiring talent, Frank Kalman warns we should not overlook human judgment. We’ve come to view human thinking as what’s wrong and technology as the solution—thinking algorithms can guide our decision-making. But not all human bias is bad.

Key takeaways:

 

3. Want to Make Your Employee Training Better?

 

Kate Rockwood, Inc

Why we picked this for you:

Say goodbye to all those boring training videos. There’s a whole new generation of innovative digital training tools to educate your increasingly Millennial workforce. New online learning tools offer more personalized, higher quality, and better designed training while achieving economies of scale. In this article, companies share some of the cool learning tools they’re using.

Key takeaways:

 

4. What New Tech Employees Need: Insights for Driving Engagement

 

Culture Amp

Why we picked this for you:

Based on survey data Culture Amp collects from hundreds of new technology companies, this report offers some interesting insights on what drives employee engagement and what separates engaged companies from the pack.

Key Takeaways:

 

5. Why Women Aren’t CEOs

 

Susan Chira, New York Times

Why we picked this for you:

After four decades of women in the workplace, only 6% are CEOs of Fortune 500 companies today. Why don’t more women get the top job? Breaking the glass ceiling is not a pipeline problem. There are plenty of women climbing the leadership ranks. Instead, it’s a result of persistent bias, deep-rooted barriers, and resistance against women once they reach the elite C-Suite. The article shares the experiences of women who got all the way to the #2 job, but were blocked in attaining that coveted #1 position.

Key Takeaways:

Stay tuned for our next L&D roundup!

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